Nov 12, 2008

If You Want Something Done...

Over at the wonderful theatre blog cleverly titled Tynan's Anger, the idea of the intersection between art and commerce is examined, specifically through the lens of theatrical production. Ethan, the blog's author, writes:
If you're in theater, even using the term "commodity" in referring to theater will make you cringe. Yet, the fact that this cringe is nearly universal is a unique thing to theater, in terms of business and even in terms of the arts.
Maybe this is the problem the arts in Canada have: people who stomp about decrying the wasteful spending of their tax dollars see artists turning away from commercial models, from things like Dirty Dancing, Jersey Boys, and The Sound of Music. Sure, on one level, it's apples and oranges comparing those sorts of shows to, say, something from Passe Muraille or the Tarragon or even Soulpepper, but still, those inside the arts community -not all, mind, but some -turn up their noses, and, to quote Jeremy Kushnier (who's in Jersey Boys), regard musicals as the dirty cousin of the stage. Hello, unity?

Without getting into an argument about what constitutes either culture or commodity, I have to say, I'm a bit surprised at the amount of shock coming from artists over the cancellation of the National Portrait Gallery. Is it really that surprising? Culture is not on Prime Minister Stephen Harper's priority list. Right or wrong, like it or lump it, it isn't there. Period. That isn't going to change.

Ergo, the onus is on us to promote our work in unorthodox, inventive ways. This is an opportunity. It means more than ever, arts companies -including theatre companies, of course -need to be more aggressive than ever to get the word out there -about who they are, what they do, how they do it, and why they do it. To quote an arts journalist friend who has covered this issue extensively, most voters who object to public funding of arts projects have a/ little to no idea of funding structures, and b/ are unaware that funding is less than half of the total operating budget of any project or company.

What does this mean? See above.

To quote Ethan again, "most theater people are introverts" -but it's time we came out of our collective safety shell of our familiar community and started courting those people coming out of the Royal Alex. Call me naive, but I think it's worth a shot, particularly since culture isn't about to be promoted by our own government anytime soon. Just as I refuse to bitch and whine about the arts' collective victimization in this country, I refuse to believe all hope is lost. It isn't. Let's go.

2 comments:

Ethan Stanislawski said...

Thanks for the link Catherine. Man, I have a hard time even fathoming the funding you guys get in Canada. Obviously I understand that it has issues of its own, but I think the issue of being in theater and living in poverty is probably less pronounced up there (and having health insurance sure helps; you have no idea what kind of theater gets held back in the U.S. because people don't want to risk going without health insurance.

MK Piatkowski said...

Can I just say a big amen?

I too refuse to believe that all hope is lost. I'm trying to find the ways to fight the PR war within a huge time crunch. Suggestions?