Nov 29, 2008

Staging War

I came across a fascinating piece on the art of staging warfare yesterday. Written by British freelance journalist and indie theatre director Imogen Russell Williams, the piece explores the whys and wherefores of staging war onstage, noting, quite rightly I think, that most theatre directors revert to some kind of cinematic equivalent in depicting fights. In reading her description of shadow play and slow-motion moves, I couldn't help but think of the innumerable productions I've sat through where both were utilized, along with pyrotechnics. To quote Williams:
Bang! Flash! Up goes a huge pile of money in undulating smoke. We're supposed to find it impressive that such crashes, bangs and wallops can be achieved even though we're in a theatre, not a cinema. But it's probably the uniting factor in bad stage warfare that director and production team are determined to pull off the cinematically spectacular even though they're making a play, not a film.
This explains (at least partly) why I didn't like Black Watch, part of Luminato this past summer. Or why so many productions of Shakespeare (and one of Marlowe) in Stratford have been disappointing; lost in the wonder of great acting, design, and staging, I've found myself jolted out of the spell by ridiculous, over-the-top fight/warfare scenes.

Note to theatre directors: try talking with some of this city's awesome puppeteers. Work with them. They're super-creative. Incorporating puppetry is just what The National Theatre in England has done with War Horse. Williams says this production changed her mind about the depiction of war onstage, and from what I've read, the piece seems genuinely moving, and thought-provoking. Puppets aren't just for kids, and never have been.

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