Jan 12, 2010

5 for '10

A new year always implies a fresh start. Those starts are always available to us whenever we so choose, but there's something so fortifying about coinciding our personal beginnings with chronological ones, as if once a year, people (or those following the Julian calendar anyway) decide, en masse, that they can influence the course of their lives through resolution, faith, commitment, and an embrace of potential. Would that this attitude could last to Easter, when the real promise of renewal has never been made so plain for Western society.

In any case, people seem to love lists -to debate, to ponder, to look back and to measure one's thoughts and accomplishments against. Should that movie be there? Why wasn't that album included? What happened to that book? We measure our lives, our personal triumphs and tragedies, which seem to be both timeless and weighted to a specific moment, against such lists. I was equally heartened and amused to see possibilities for potential laid out in one particular list; some of the items are foolhardy, some are curious, some are inspired -but the spirit behind them all is, I think, genuine, and the spark of springy hopefulness is encouraging in these dour midwinter days.

So, as before, here is a list -a personal one -of things I am looking forward to in 2010:

More Live Music
While I am not a particularly big fan of club gigs (I never really was -comes with being raised in opera houses, I suppose) there are a few acts I'm hoping to see (and blog about) this year, including The Big Pink and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. I was introduced to the former by a fellow twitterati with exquisite music taste who saw them in an early-winter gig here in Toronto and was suitably impressed; having heard The Big Pink's stuff on the radio both prior and following that concert, I've become entranced by their marriage of old and new sounds. This is rock and roll you can dance to. I like that. And... BRMC? Dirty, good, loud. I'll take it.

Pop Life
Happening at the National Gallery of Canada in June, this exhibit is featuring works of my very-favourites, including Tracey Emin, Takashi Murakami, Damien Hirst, Andy Warhol, and (sigh!) Keith Haring. It's only January but I'm already excited. I can think of no other group of artists who have so changed the modern cultural landscape -and in so doing, altered the way we experience culture and its relationship to the everyday mundane reality of daily life. Thank you, National Gallery!

MOMAhhh
Still in the art vein, the venerable New York City art museum is hosting an exhibit of the works of Henri Cartier-Bresson, the first in the US in three decades. Exploring the entirety of the master photographer's career, Cartier-Bresson was, and remains, one of my all-time favourites. I recall studying his works in film school many moons ago, and being drawn in by the inherent drama within his photographs. Suitably, MOMA's website calls him "the keenest observer of the global theater of human affairs". Yes, his work is indeed theatrical, but it's also fleshily, gorgeously human and sensuously alive. If this doesn't push me on to visit France at last, I don't know what will.

Prima Donna
Presented as part of the 2010 Luminato Festival, "Prima Donna" will receive its North American premiere this June. Awesome Canadian singer/songwriter/all-around music god Rufus Wainwright channels his own inner diva and his passion for the operatic form in creating a work about the fictional faded opera star Regine and the re-examination of her life choices. When it debuted in Manchester last July, the New York Times called the music "impressionistic yet neo-medieval, tinged with modal harmonies". Hopefully I'll be interviewing the heavenly-voiced Mr. Wainwright about it closer to the opening. Stay tuned.

Toot Toot
I feel like there's a big piece of me I've been hiding away that should probably come out. In that vein, I'm going to be posting my artwork, photography, and video interviews more often. This video is a favourite from last year. It's about the award-winning production of "Eternal Hydra" by Crow's Theatre:



So here's to embracing... everything... which is everything, after all. I think Lauryn Hill expresses it best:
after winter / must come spring / change it comes / eventually

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