Jan 3, 2010

Gracias, Lhasa

It was with great sadness, and more than a little shock, that I learned of Lhasa de Sela's recent passing. The gypsy-esque, European-influenced singer has become a favourite of mine, with her hauntingly sensual low voice, poetic, surreal lyrics, and open embrace of various cultural sounds, from Latin-influenced to Eastern European, and all genres - folk, rock, electronica, klezmer -in-between



I remember being excited and little nervous when I interviewed Lhasa last spring about her new album. After the rich, gleeful sounds of 1998's La Llorona, and the world-folk sounds of 2003's The Living Road, she wasn't sure people would be prepared for the moody, stripped-down atmosphere of her newest, self-titled offering, recorded entirely live. Our conversation ran the gamut, from background to influences to singing styles. We tossed around the benefit and drawbacks of analog and digital technologies; we talked about soul music, and since visual art played a big part in her albums, we talked about the relationships between music and visuals. I'll never forget what she said: "music is a conversation; art is just for yourself."



Lhasa's music defiantly (fabulously) rejects any easy categorization or definition, in the same manner that many of my favourite artists do, including, notably, Gavin Friday. In these days where pop, rock, dance, rap, hip-hop and country are both more loosely defined and yet more rigorously defined (and defining) than ever, Lhasa's music was (and remains) a breath of fresh air. Curiosity, passion, and an indefatigable spirit to explore new-meets-old sonic territory in unusual, challenging ways is a hallmark of good artistry, and a demonstration of commitment to one's craft (or muse, if you will). Lhasa was committed. Her music doesn't always make you comfortable; it makes you think. It takes you to places where you'd rather not venture, but can't say "no" to. Her voice was a call to stumble, trance-like, up a hill, in the dark, knees bleeding, hands scraping at dirt, and then stand at the edge of a windy cliff, not merely admiring the view but wondering at horrors you left lurking below, and distorting them into shapes you could at least live with -until the next siren song, anyway.

Losing her is upsetting for so many reasons: she was so young; she hadn't found the kind of acclaim at home that she'd found overseas; there's still so much she had to give the world. Lhasa had an uncanny ability to pull her own experiences through the intricate, beautiful webs of tone, timbre, syllables and symbols, rendering the intimate epic, and shrinking the absolute to lacy uncertainty. As she told me in the spring,
That’s one of the wonderful things about music: you can say very intimate things, and they become universal - other people can relate to them. If it was just me singing about me, then I would feel embarrassed. I feel like I’m searching for the grain of something other people can understand.
Ultimately, art is about connection. Getting the chance to connect with Lhasa for twenty minute was a treat I'll always cherish. "Now that my heart is open / there is no way it can be closed or broken."

3 comments:

X said...

your writing flows from the music that inspired you.

Ricky Johnson said...



What a great article. Thanks for sharing. We are always looking to innovate and carry the industry forward by sharing great practices. What are your thoughts on digital advertising in regards to SEO, Graphic Design and Content? Visit at centermassmedia.com

Ricky Johnson said...



What a great article. Thanks for sharing. We are always looking to innovate and carry the industry forward by sharing great practices. What are your thoughts on digital advertising in regards to SEO, Graphic Design and Content? Visit at centermassmedia.com