Jul 24, 2010

What She Wore

Clothing is a personal thing for many women. That material intimacy is something the Nora Ephron and Delia Ephron understand very well.

The award-winning duo, who've penned some of my favorite movies (including Nora's "When Harry Met Sally"), have brought their award-winning play Love, Loss, And What I Wore to Toronto. It runs at the cozy Panasonic Theatre through the end of the summer. A portion of ticket sales will, appropriately, benefit Dress For Success, a fantastic charity that provides professional services (including attire) to disadvantaged women. What a perfect fit.

The Ephrons' monologue-style play features a collection of stories that connect certain outfits with special, significant life moments. There's the story of wedding dresses, sexy boots, and the joys (or not) of purses, the challenges of mothers, the pangs of body types, and the perfection that is "BLLAAACK!". It's all melded together with happy/sad/bittersweet/funny flavours. Performers Andrea Martin, Mary Walsh, Louise Pitre, Sharron Matthews and Paula Brancati do a truly fantastic job of combining the happy and the sad with equal dollops of grace, charm, wit, and sensitivity.

I asked the Toronto-based actor and performer Sharron Matthews about her thoughts around clothing, creativity, and cabaret recently. She has a long history of performance, with everything from Les Miserables to Mean Girls on her resume, and is a positively radiant stage presence. Her responses are very enlightening and refreshingly honest. Enjoy.

Which aspects of Love, Loss, And What I Wore do you most relate to?

That is a hard question. Not because I don't feel like I relate, but because the things that I seem to relate to are a bit challenging for me to acknowledge. My first monologue is about a child losing a parent and when the material assignments were sent out I was hoping and dreading that I might get this piece. I lost my dad when I was very young and it had a huge impact on my family. I also talk a lot about my weight, now it fluctuates and how hard being a big girl can be. I was a bit nervous about doing these pieces as well but the more I read them the more I thought, "Well, these are truthful and this a group of women that needs to be represented in fabulousness as well as in hardship."

Why do you think so many women associate clothing with other things? Do you think women are more prone to association (& connection) than men?

I think that women are more 'collectors' then men are: (of) shoes, jackets, purses. Men don't have as many accessories as we do, as a rule. Some of us have closets that are like art galleries... I know I do... featuring shoe boxes with pictures of the shoes on them. And yes, I do think we are more prone to association and connection. We are also, for the most part, more sentimental. We see "a shirt that a wore on my first job interview, the day I was hired to begin my career"...and men see a shirt. I think that it can be a sensual thing, the feel of a fabric or the smell but is also a sense-memory thing... we feel something and we sometimes be in that place again... recalling our emotions.

How much has your other work, specifically in TV and film, has been useful in doing the Ephrons' work?

Though I have worked in TV and film -of course not as much as Paula, Mary and Andrea -I think that my work in cabaret, as a storyteller has been my greatest asset with the stories in Love, Loss And What I Wore. I feel right at home in this piece. The audience is present and a part of the piece and the stories are brief... like a song.

Define 'cabaret' as it is, now. What does it mean to you? What do you think it means to audiences of the 21st century?

I went online to look for some definitions of cabaret. They are all very dry and general: "a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theatre, distinguished mainly by the performance venue." I recently did a cabaret that was a part of the Young Centre's Saturday Night Cabaret Series and (their) description is one of my favourites: ''Cabaret is a combination of intimacy, personality, and social contact."

So my definition of cabaret is a evening of musical storytelling including themes that are universal and accessible, but challenging at the same time. I love cabaret. It is the way I best feel (able to) express myself and really explore my creativity and my artistic voice.

I also think that cabaret can be performed "intimately" in a huge theatre. (It) is an art form that is not fully recognized in Canada.

To some, the word 'cabaret' conjures up images of singers belting out "My Way" in gold lame outfits . I am slowly trying to change that perception. I believe that cabaret is a journey, not the picture I just described. It is a form of storytelling to me. A way of breaking down the fourth wall an reaching out to people.

Stage or screen -what's your favorite?

Having done screen work, I have a huge respect for people who work in film and TV day in and day out. Film acting is a true skill and the people who do it well are artists as well as technicians. I enjoy the spontaneity that is the stage. It is so live in front of an audience and you can never be totally sure what is going to happen. I like to feel an immediate response to what I do... it fuels me to move forwards. I love the stage.

Photos by Cylla von Tiedemann.

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