Oct 6, 2010

The Grind

So much seen and done over the past week. Nuit Blanche, the opening of the Canadian Opera Company season, and the Brickworks Picnic within the last few days (to say nothing of the myriad of wonderful people I've interviewed on-air recently) ... you'd think I'd choose something more timely to write about than a concert that's still over a month away. But thanks to a fabulous Twitter contact and a bit of online listening (along with a whack of sentimentality), well ... sometimes the music chooses us, softly crooning -or in this case, mawkishly shrieking -a chorus of angular 'musts' and jagged 'nows' -as in, Write Something Now. Sometimes I ignore that call; sometimes I toss away the turgid details of everyday life away and just dance. Then I pour a glass of something wonderful and write.

Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds was not the first band I saw solo -but the first time I saw Nick Cave et al I did happen to be solo. The difference is fine but important. Special is the artist (or collection of artists) that I'll merrily throw away social anxiety to become purposely lost in the Enchanted Forest of Noise. But Cave is that special breed of artist. Recently I came across a review I breathlessly typed up many moons ago for an international music zine. In those dot-matrix filled pages, I enthused, admired, mused, and wondered at the sonic noise/poetic genius of the Bad Seeds. At the time Nick Cave had a sizeable troupe with him; not only was he joined by original members Mick Harvey, Martyn Casey, Thomas Wydler, Conway Savage, & the ever-amazing Blixa Bargeld, but he was joined by two musicians who, in retrospect, changed the course of his -and their (and possibly even my) creative output. Warren Ellis and Jim Sclavunos added a creepy, dramatic, other-worldly feel to an already-raucous musical outfit. I remember beeing especially impressed with Ellis' stomping and passionate embrace of his violin, conjuring evil, twisted spirits, whacking his instrument's wooden body and plucking its strings, a possessed look on his (then-handsome) face.

I came away from the evening with a wholly new appreciation of musicianship, the art of the band as a concept, and the joy of spontaneously solo-show-going. There was something about being alone that rendered me much more open to everything. It was as if my aural/emotional/spiritual absorbative powers increased twenty-fold. And, as a woman, I was suddenly free to expore -and embrace -the amazing power of my own aggression within a positive context. Even now, more than a decade later, that night lives within me. And re-reading my young and breathless review makes me want to step out of my grown-upish, self-imposed (and kind of boring) safety zone, even just for one night, to jump and dance through that mad forest of sonic mayhem again.





The internet gods seems to be with me. A few nights ago, I engaged in an online conversation about Cave's other band, Grinderman, and the wonders of their live set. I'd been debating going to Grinderman's concert here in Toronto in November. There are so many "unlike" factors: I don't like lines, I don't like crowds, and I most definitely don't like being pushed and shoved. My short stature renders me a near-target for boots-in-the-head and obnoxious tall people who can't dance standing in front of me. That's to say nothing of the wild, horrific social anxiety I feel when entering a club gig alone -it's like there's a sticker on my head reading"Lone Thirty-Something Woman Lacking A Relationship." I bring little but my opinions and big hair; the heels stay firmly in the closet. But social anxiety and the fear of being judged melt away like butter in a hot frying pan the minute an artist (or group of artists) I love takes to the stage. The magical, and frankly, sexy melange of lights, costumes, body language, sound, and frankly, the knowledge there's a few hundred (or thousand) sweaty bodies behind me is, all together, deeply, almost dangerously intoxicating. I wind up staying awake long after such experiences, staring out windows, drawing, sipping wines and trying not to leap to easy definitions or categories. Some experiences are too deep for that.

But try my darndest I did back when I first saw the Bad Seeds. That sense of joy, that freedom, that wiping away of time and space and social anxieties ... they touch on something profound about the power of art, and the role it plays in shaping identities. I think I'll go see Grinderman. Maybe I'll write a breathy blog. Or maybe, this time, I'll savour the experience like a tasty, sweet bonbon enjoyed in a dark, silent room. Either way, being a part of the magical sound of Nick Cave and (as I put it in 1998) his "band of unmerry men" will always be a treat. I may not be able to come down and write about it for a while, though. And that's probably a good thing.

1 comment:

Northern Star said...

< I wind up staying awake long after such experiences, staring out windows, drawing, sipping wines and trying not to leap to easy definitions or categories. Some experiences are too deep for that>

I react much the same after some concerts, amazing experiences indeed. Enjoyed your post a lot!