Apr 23, 2011

On Bill The Quill


Today marks the anniversary of Shakespeare's death in 1616 (and, some might argue, his birth in 1564).

Much has been written, of course, about the playwright who left an indelible mark on drama and culture. It's impossible to imagine life without him; like Andy Warhol (more on him in a future post), his influence is felt everywhere. Amidst the volumes of academia and the wide-eyed worship, I frequently feel as if the human -the regular, ordinary, beer-swilling, bum-pinching Bill -gets lost.

Filmmaker Anna Cohen seeks to find him, with this wonderful stop-motion animation video, Shakespearean Tragedy (A Comedy), that reminds us that Shakespeare probably suffered from something that afflicts writers everywhere. Hey, we all know Romeo And Juliet was inspired by various poems and stories, but it's fun to see the figures come to life on the blank pages before him, and I love the contemporary touches.

I never enjoyed reading Shakespeare myself; when I'd have to do for high school or university, I'd go to the library and borrow the RSC audio or video performances. There's something about hearing those words aloud, in all their rhythmic, dancing, shimmying glory, that makes them -and their creator -feel more alive.

The clever thing about this video is that there's no dialogue -it's entirely visual. What would Bill say? What should he say? It's refreshing to see a figure held in such high regard by so many has been rendered more human, even in clay.

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