Aug 5, 2012

Loss (& Magic)

Roughly an hour after my review of a new musical was posted came word that Chavela Vargas had passed. There was something eerie in the timing; my review had got me thinking more than ever about Astrid Kirchherr and women like her  - the strong, uncompromising female artists who refused to fit into tidy pre-determined roles around their femininity and whose art was never determined solely by their gender or the place that put that at in the world.

Vargas, the throaty Latin singer had long been a favorite of mine. The first time I saw her, in Frida, I was entranced. What a voice... what a soul... what a presence.



It feels as if this year has been a horrible one for losing strong female artists and presences. Zelda Kaplan, who passed in February, was another sparky figure I greatly admired; my clubbing days would've extended longer, I think, had I had gone with her. There was an Auntie Mame-esque joie de vivre about her. Alternately, Nora Ephron and Maeve Binchy felt like confidantes -the sort who'd be hilariously blunt with how ugly those jeans look on you, and why you (I) should stay from men who don't do a lot of reading or like art galleries. Donna Summer was the woman who stopped everyone talking (and got them dancing); self-contained in her sensuousness, confident in her calm sexuality, she never had to try hard, she simply was. Real sex appeal, as I recently told a friend, can't be faked. It only fools some of the people some of the time.

Donna Summer's moans, simpers, sighs and statements were a declaration of her independence, alright -the exact same way Chavela Vargas' anguished, fierce, defiant tones were. They still are, for me and female artists everywhere. Their tunes didn't definer them as a woman; they defined them as fleshy, living human beings: let me be what I am, here and now.

There's so much more I could say, should say, about these women, but it's not the time or place, and I still haven't finished meditating on their role in my life, or mourning their loss. Lou Reed's 1992 album Magic And Loss captures much of this feeling, of losing personal friends who were also artistic heroes. Creative and personal so often bleeds over in life, and in art. That's probably a good thing.

All I can say at this point is: Dear Ms. Kirchherr, please hang on. I haven't met you yet, and I want to.

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