Jun 26, 2012

Good and Hot



The New York Times featured this lovely work by animator Gary Leib today. With a gorgeously simple sax soundtrack by Mike Hashim, the just-over two-minute video portrays city life in all its surreal splendour an sordid squalor. There's so much going on this piece of animation that reflects life in New York in 2012: peoples' sense of isolation mixed with a weary independence; their close relationship to pets; their love/hate relationships with nature and nurture; the dreariness of work; and the fortifying comfort of old (addictive) habits as a means of bolstering an ever-shifting identity. The animation is both whimsical and surreal, innocent and haunting - suitable for a man who created the sublimely bizarre underground comic Idiotland (gorgeous front and back covers here),  and whose work I've enjoyed seeing in The New Yorker now for a while.


Also: viva coffee! Though I used to be a hardcore tea drinker, lately I can't start the day without a good strong cup poured from the French press. Thank you NYT; thank you Mr. Leib; I'll think of ravenous birds and waitresses with bottomless carafes as I take my first morning sips now.

Jun 25, 2012

Lush Landscape



This just blew me out of my chair.

I've sat through many awful Jobim interpretations. However, this cover, by Gretchen Parlato and Esperanza Spalding, is well and truly astonishing; it doesn't belong anywhere near the tired old "predictable Jobim cover" bin.

Perhaps I've had covers on the brain lately, what with seeing Bettye LaVette perform this past weekend (and falling even more in love with that raspy voice of hers, if that's possible), and giving Robert Plant's Band Of Joy record a much-overdue re-listen -but it feels like when artists cover others artists' work, they take the safe high road of sonic politeness and predictability. If I wanted to hear it exactly like the original... hell, I'd put the original on for myself. When I hear an artist do a cover version, I want something creative, original, soulful, and thought-provoking; I don't have to agree with the result to appreciate the effort, but I want the feel the artist understands the meaning of the word "interpret." Most don't, or are cowed by the potential hisses of shrewd audiences. But what is artistry without a bit of risk? Chances are that just as many people will be pleased as be pissed off. Dear Artists: take the risk!

A composer like Jobim simply begs for interpretation. This duet delivers the goods. The poetically simple instrumentation - voices, hands, bass - combined with the tonal variations in voices, combined with that gorgeous, loping bassline, make for a swoon-worthy listen. My Monday just got a whole better hearing/watching this. Give it a watch/listen - yours may, too.

Addendum: for a beautiful version of the original, check out Ella Fitzgerald singing "Useless Landscape" live at Montreux in 1969. Awesome scatting included. Swooooon.

Jun 23, 2012

Worms, Soil, Sounds

Summer makes posting blogs here difficult because a/ it's festival season, meaning I'm busy reporting (and interviewing awesomely cool people like Bettye LaVette, woot!); b/ when I'm not writing I'm researching and doing the social media thing; and c/ when I'm not doing either of those (which takes up a fair chunk of time in any given day), I'm trying to do all the things I promised myself I'd do, namely, read more fiction, and expand my musical knowledge, as I wrote about in my last post.

Oh, and when I'm not doing THAT, I'm in the garden.

Along with a few discoveries amidst the weeds and ever-shifting soil, I've made a few musical ones too. (Soundcheck, you'd be proud!)

First, I sat down and finally listened to the entirety of Some Girls, by The Rolling Stones something I'd not done before. The reissue bonus track "Keep Up Blues" was my favorite - the corollaries between it and contemporary rap were especially striking, as was Mick's sexy, strutting delivery. I could practically see him thrusting hips and lips out in the studio. Brilliant. Hot. Listen.



Secondly, Tumblr is really becoming my mode of choice to discover new music. I came across English band the xx only today, and was struck by the way they're able to combine verbal and sonic poetry in one gorgeous package. This song is also wildly romantic, as reflected in the lyrics:

And I'll cross oceans, like never before
So you can feel the way I feel too
And I'll mirror images back at you
So you can see the way I feel too





The rhythmic repetition of such simple words and sounds is beautifully echoed in an aching series of guitar lines, making for a very haunting (if addictive) listen.


Speaking of rhythmic combinations of words and music... this is amazing:



It's taken from Strange Passion, a compilation of Irish post-punk and experimental music that's recently been released through Rough Trade. Irish music site Thumped.com wrote in their review of the album that "this compilation has become crucial, already. Hats off to all involved." I take that "crucial" to be applicable to anyone interested in not only the history of modern Irish music, but in understanding where we are now, in our very synth-sounding world.

I love "Fire From Above" because it's so amazingly modern, and again, has a gorgeous poetry that references both the clinical emotional calculation of Kraftwerk, along with a certain menacing joy that totally reminds of early 80s New York sounds. The chords are lifted right from Pachelbel's (in)famous Canon, but have a bouncy synth beat beneath them. And the words are just as moving, with an old-world weariness and youthful exuberance, combined with a rhythmic interplay with their synthesized accompaniments that makes you listen in just that much closer.

Here's to digging up more good stuff as the summer progresses.

Jun 5, 2012

Resolution Revolution, With Dancing

Today: 2pm hit and I made a face.

I don't recognize this.

Then I remembered: Soundcheck ended. Well, not ended forever, but the celebrated afternoon music show on WNYC has taken a hiatus for the summer. It's being re-imagined and re-tooled for its post-Labor Day return (in a new evening timeslot) and you can follow its progress online.

Friday's final afternoon program was all about resolutions - specifically musical ones. John Schaefer's call to listeners, asking them what musical promises they wanted to keep, got me thinking, and feeling more than a little guilty. I've been making audio commitments to myself now for ages: I'm going to listen to this new album. I'm going to check out that cool band. I'm going to get to more live shows. 

And despite covering The Cult's new album, getting into a great new DJ, and seeing Garbage live, I still feel like I'm not doing enough. With every new week comes a new onslaught of albums, bands, shows, all of which I feel I should be paying more attention to.  Then there's the backwards glance - and a glance is really all it's been when it comes to my own, embarrassingly limited musical knowledge.

Raised as a classical music-playing child, I didn't really find out about the work and influence Bob Dylan, David Bowie, or The Rolling Stones until well into adolescence. My house was filled with the sounds of Cash, Presley, and ABBA (to say nothing of Back, Beethoven, and Mozart) for many years. Later, with my very-own turntable in my bedroom, neither The Clash and nor Black Flag provided the soundtrack to teenaged rebellion; Aretha Franklin, Ronnie Spector, and Donna Summer did. I related to the strong, glamorous ladies whose music I could dance to. A big part of me still does.



The first time I heard Bob Dylan I was fifteen years old. The song was "Tangled Up In Blue" and it was played to me by a Dylan-loving friend of my mother's. I'd never heard anything like it; the words dripped with angst, and anger, and a world-weariness I hadn't quite known before. Somehow, it made the grunge explosion that followed in popular culture make more sense. A guest of Schaefer's on Friday confessed she didn't know enough about Dylan's either, and that her musical resolution over the summer was to correct that oversight.

It was oddly comforting to hear that kind of confession in such a public forum. Admitting you don't know the canons of such huge music monoliths in public is hard, and it was nice to see Soundcheck - a show I consider to be as much entertainment as education, and a major smarty-pants beacon of deep pop culture know-how -welcome such curiosity with open arms. It's nice to not be afraid of judgment, or be worried about appearing uncool, of lacking taste, of being plain stupid, but to just be welcomed and accepted.

Perhaps that's why the "ending" of Soundcheck hit me harder than I expected, and why today's 2pm mix-up was a bit of a slug in the guts. Schaefer and the fantastic Soundcheck team have provided a wonderful forum for the musically curious masses (with whom I deeply identify) to learn, to ask questions, to branch out, to exercise our curious ear-muscles and maybe have a dance or two across our office/kitchen floors. Thusly inspired, this is what I'd like: to further my contemporary music-scene knowledge while deepening my appreciation of its past. Can it be done with any measure of success? I'll let you know when Soundcheck's back on the air in September. I'm starting here. Don't judge.

(Top photo from Sodahead)