Mar 5, 2014

Life in the Poppies

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Prince Igor is haunting.

Days after seeing the Met Opera's luscious production, I'm still mulling its beautiful marriage of images, design, music, and performance. Though there's nothing wrong with pure delight and pure entertainment -- they make so much of the world go round -- seeing the Borodin work did much more than provide an escape from every day mundanities. Thoughts of Ukraine filled my mind, along with more personal reflections on events this past fall; I found myself questioning my relationship with power, both personal and professional, and the role of ego in compromise and defeat. Prince Igor isn't just beautiful to look at; it's simultaneously intimate and epic, with resonance in both the inner and outer aspects of existence.

A large part of the opera's power (as directed and re-imagined by its talented director/designer Dmitri Tcherniakov) is derived through its depiction of war. Though the opera is based on a medieval Russian folk tale involving Igor going off to fight (and he believes,  conquer) the Polovtsians, and subsequently suffering a horrific defeat, Tcherniakov was very selective (make that laser-pointed-strategic) in his use of on and offstage bloodletting. He used a combination of contemporary black-and-white video (using many fast edits and long pans), as well as grand set pieces, costuming, and striking makeup to depict the horrors of war -- the loss of life, and the loss of self too. In this Prince Igor, they are very much the same thing.

What I found myself mulling over into the wee hours this past Saturday evening was Igor's sense of himself, his relationship with other people, and the ways his identity are forced to shift after enduring cataclysmic hardship. Lead bass baritone Ildar Abdrazakov is a thoroughly moving singer, and a very fine actor too;  his expressive face, soft brown eyes, and bear-like physique reveal a man moving between identities, letting go of old ideas and comforts, shifting into far less safe, comfortable, places within himself. These changes aren't fun or nice or the stuff of easy cliches; this is an Igor who is fallible, failing, heartbreakingly vulnerable, a man struggling with the chimera of ego that kept showing itself in various forms and fashions. He has to relinquish it entirely in order to rebuild, both literally and figuratively.

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This transformation is hinted at through the wonder that is the Polovtsian dances, whose staging, in Tcherniakov's assured hands, is nothing short of miraculous. Igor whirls around an immense, lush poppy field as human figures dance and undulate around him; it's dreamy and poetic and earthy yet unearthly. The Met chorus are positioned in boxes close to the stage, allowing dancers to move about freely to the writhing, hypnotic, East-meets-West choreography of Itzik Galili and associate choreographer Elisabeth Gibiat. Igor's face is one of delight and joy, as if he's found refuge from the horrors of war and grandiose ambition. Yet we know it's all an illusion; he's hallucinating everything. It's this knowledge that fuels the extraordinary power of the scene. How can something so beautiful be so far removed from reality? And why is reality so much harder and more hideous? Why can't we stay in the poppy fields forever? Why can't we whirl, Dervish-like, to the beautiful sounds and visions, forever and ever? It was fascinating to observe Igor's wife, Yaroslavna (Oksana Dyka) being included in this scene, as if she represents a kind of authenticity and grounding he so desperately lacks. There's a knowingness to her inclusion here, as if Tcherniakov wants to remind us of the power balances within intimate relationships, and to note how those balances translate in the wider world. To see a man of Abdrazakov's physicality rendered so vulnerable before the wife whose advice he had earlier eschewed, is deeply moving and wildly important; even amidst the hallucination -- or especially because of it -- we see a more honest version of Igor that needs to show itself in the real world.

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And it does, eventually show. You sense a deep transformation as Igor wanders, shell-shocked, through what was once his elegant, pristine palace in the final act, when it is a literal shell of its former self. He turns his back on the worshipful masses who herald his return, realizing worship isn't what's needed. He woke up, and in so doing, so did we. It's precisely what his hubris hath wrought, this destruction. The very centrality of Igor's mission -- charging off to some distant victory you are so sure will be yours -- has been destroyed; as such, so has Igor's sense of identity. You can't find yourself in something so far outside yourself, the production whispers, amidst its gloriously crashing choruses and pounding percussion; you can't be inauthentic when the chips are down. It won't work. Hell breaks loose. People die. A part of you dies. And somehow, in some horrifying way, that's precisely how it should be.

If you get the chance to see Prince Igor either in-person at the Met or through its Live In HD series, go. You'll mull relationships to power, ego, sacrifice and compromise. You'll hear beautiful music. You'll see some gorgeous/disturbing things. You won't look at the news/your rulers/your lovers/your life the same way again. You will be haunted.

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