May 1, 2015

The Real Cosmopolitan

Photo via CBC Music
It was with a heavy heart that I heard about the passing of CBC Radio host Jurgen Gothe last month.

I'd been thinking a lot about him lately, what with starting my own radio show this past January, and a recent stock-taking of old cookbooks, where I found DiscCookery amongst my culinary collection. Gothe had penned the work on the 20th anniversary of his popular afternoon radio program, DiscDrive, in 2005.

The program, aired on CBC Radio 2, was a regular part of my young life; it was always on in the house or the car after school, and even when I started going to university, I found myself turning it on during my long commutes, between blaring the Pearl Jam CD and the Tom Waits cassette tape. The program's avuncular host had a broadcasting style both elegant and casual at once, like a warm designer cardigan found in a Kensington Market stall; it was something very fine and special, though it was equally familiar, casual, and approachable.

After years of listening, it only feels right to call Jurgen by his first name, despite never working with him, and only meeting him briefly. Part of what I loved (and still love) about Jurgen is how much he defied the stereotypical "Canadian" cliche. He wasn't a maple-syrup-and-hockey-with-Tim-Horton's-tell-me-aboat-it-eh kind of guy (even though he named the Canucks as his favorite sports team). He was smart, well-spoken, curious, deeply interested in viniculture, cuisine, and the world of arts and culture as embodied in his weekday program — but that didn't make him distant; it made him cool.

The quote on the back of DiscCookery (from the Globe and Mail) called DiscDrive "(t)he most intelligent radio in the country."The program was a charming compendium of facts, stories, passions, and pursuits; he'd play Mozart and Bach alongside Grappelli and Ellington. I was introduced to Billie Holiday's magical, horn-like voice on DiscDrive, along with the sad sighs of Marin Marais' viola da gamba pieces; I ventured into jazz clubs in New York because of the curiosity Jurgen fostered. I gained a whole new appreciation in my Toronto Symphony Symphony concerts, recalling a funny anecdote Jurgen shared about Mozart as I listened to "Eine Kleine Nachtsmusik", or a food-wine pairing as one of Beethoven's rich, meaty overtures washed over me.

Radio can change the way a person experiences the world; some programs will only confirm a worldview, while others help to expand, widen, and celebrate it. DiscDrive did all that, and more, helping me say, out loud, "yes, I love these things" while simultaneously making me question the whole idea of "Canadiana" and its relationship with a rapidly changing culture.

Jurgen himself defied the "hoser" cliche by embracing a cosmopolitan curiosity that he then transmitted over the airwaves; his wasn't an attitude of superiority or snobbery. Quite the opposite. It was his warmth and joy and genuinely curious approach — all the things I try to emulate in my own broadcasting life. I miss Jurgen, and I miss Disc Drive — but the things they stood for and provided continue to inspire. My favorite sweater is so warm, and I am forever grateful.

Photo via CBC Music


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