Aug 16, 2015

Casta Diva


Tomorrow will mark three weeks since my mother passed away.

It feels odd to write that sentence, and odd to sit and look at it. Those are words I never thought I'd write at this stage of my life, in a blog no less, for everyone to see. There's something so awfully personal about losing her, and I've encountered so many emotions and memories the last while — things I want to keep private, things I want to keep in a sacred space, things said and done and understood that need to exist only in the intimate space that existed between her and me. That may change in time, but for now, there are some doors that are remaining firmly shut.

Still, it's hard for me to quantify the effect my mother has had (and continues to have) on my life. So much of what I love — music, theatre, opera, art — stems from her exposing me, at a very early age, to culture. It's become the stuff of folklore to those who knew us well to hear I was in piano lessons at four, an opera gown at five, attending symphonies at six. Much as she complained about and worried over the inconsistencies of my chosen livelihood, she also knew I wasn't really qualified to do anything else, that writing about (and for) the arts was, and remains, as natural to as breathing, as urgent as scratching a bite, as inevitable as sighing.

And I've been sighing a lot lately — over the times we shared, of course, but also over all the things she isn't here to experience. Bellini's great bel canto work Norma was on CBC's Saturday Afternoon At The Opera program today, and I shed a few tears, and heaved a few sighs, thinking back both to my swooning exclamations to her after seeing Sandra Radvanovsky sing the role live in New York in 2013, and feeling horribly sad at the fact she wasn't here to listen to the broadcast and rejoice in it as I was. Her absence feels like a horrible robbery to me, still — a robbery not solely to me, but to everyone whose life she touched (and there were many), and to the many worlds she moved between: cultural, financial, social, familial. Much as we are robbed by her absence, we were graced by her presence, and no one benefited more from that grace than I did. If I had a sense of gratitude before her passing, that sense has deepened, widened, broadened, become almost all-encompassing, to the point that a piece of music, an aria, even the most brief and beautifully-played phrase, will still me, awe me, set me to tears and sighs and silence. Productivity lately, as you might guess, has been something of a miracle — and yet I carry on being busy, because I know it's precisely what she would want.

Still, there are many moments throughout the day that call for pause. The tickets for this season's Canadian Opera Company productions sit in their envelope on the refrigerator in the kitchen, where I do most of my work; I stare at them and wonder what will happen the next few months. I couldn't (wouldn't) have ever dreamed I'd be without her a few months ago. Now, I find myself looking up from my work and over at the fridge — and I'm hungry, but not for what's on the other side of the door. It's going to be painful to enter the doors of the Four Seasons Centre without her, even with all the kind expressions of support I've received from fellow opera-going friends. How do you negotiate a world you've only ever known with someone else? "Make it your own" is a tidy little saying, but it feels far too trite, and somehow, too limiting.

So much of my cultural life is bound up in sharing what I love with others, in bringing them into the arts world to experience and exchange ideas, insights, inspirations. That's a big reason I'm an arts journalist: I like to share what I love and think is relevant, important, moving, enraging, beautiful. I think my mother saw and appreciated that toward the end of her life. As I said in my eulogy at her funeral service, I am who and what I am because of her; my world has been shaped accordingly.

Now I face a world shaped by her absence. I will, of course, see and hear her everywhere — on the radio, between the notes, within the sighs, in the opera house — but it isn't the same. Seeing the spaces where she should sit, hearing the arias she'd swoon over, hugging the people she adored, eating the (rare) dishes she enjoyed — these things underline and highlight an absence that is still, for all intensive purposes, a shock. Art doesn't help to answer any of the questions I'm left with, or resolve the sea of emotions I'm navigating, but it does remind me of the legacy that lives within me, and within those who've checked out a production, a show, a book, a movie, a restaurant, because of our loud, shared cultural passion. This was her gift; it remains her lifetime contribution, one that defies even death, one that I hope will counteract the yawning absence, and become a part of a divine presence that never leaves.


1 comment:

MK Piatkowski said...

I had to write a post like this back in April - it's stripping down and being naked so major applause to you for writing it.

What I can tell you is that when you use those tickets, she'll still be there with you. She heard the aria on the CBC and any moment when you think of her. If you open yourself up to it, you'll still hear her thoughts. She'll still inspire you. And there will be times when the grief ambushes you and times you handle things better than you thought you would.

Most of all, be gentle with yourself. Grieve in your own way and on your own timetable. Don't let anyone tell you any different.