Apr 28, 2017

"You Can Feel Every Word"

Tito Gobbi as Scarpia and Maria Callas as Tosca, from a 1965 production of Tosca (via)
In the early days of video recording technology, my mother would tape any and every opera production broadcast on PBS. By the end of the 1980s, we had a huge collection of VHS tapes, all carefully labelled in my mother's tidy handwriting. Some we'd never watch again; some lived in the VCR. One that I kept going back to, from the time I was a child, was Puccini's Tosca; I think it was the first opera I watched repeatedly (at least until we got hold of a copy of Francesco Rosi's raunchy Carmen), and one I never got bored of, either musically or dramatically. Many a rainy summer's day was spent in front of the TV, my friends and I with our root beer floats in hand, watching Hildegard Behrens, Placido Domingo, and Cornell MacNeil swirl, roar, sweat, and sigh through Franco Zeffirelli's opulent production. My youthful passion for the production was what inspired my mother to return to the Met after well over a decade of absence; this time she brought an excited little girl who sat pie-eyed throughout the whole thing, wearing shiny shoes, a smart little red jacket, and a giant smile.

We owned a few classic recordings of Puccini's famous 1899 work, and even now, putting those vinyl recordings on (the Callas/Gobbi version especially), I'm struck by just how dramatically expressive the score is. Tosca a great introduction for young newcomers to the world of opera; the music clearly tells you everything you need to know. A passionate lady lead! A persecuted lover! A rip-roaring bad guy! It's the stuff of great novels, old Hollywood, dreamy (if doomed) romances. As well as entertainment value, so many personal memories are connected to this work, including the premiere Met visit. I was simultaneously scared of and thrilled by Scarpia, and for years, I couldn't see (much less hear) MacNeil as anything but the dastardly villain of the piece. Hearing the opening notes of his introduction still sends a shiver down my spine. Years later, my father would play the famous "E lucevan le stelle" ("And the stars were shining") for me on his violin, unbidden. It was the last thing I heard him play.

It was a thrill to learn Argentinian tenor Marcelo Puente would be performing as Mario Cavaradossi (who sings that famous aria in the opera's last act) for the Canadian Opera Company's spring production of Toscaand opposite the great soprano Adrienne Pieczonka, whose work I so enjoyed last month at the Met, in Fidelio. I've followed Puente's work for years, and have admired his passionate, head-first approach to dramatic material, as well as his golden, honey-toned tenor voice. He recently made his Covent Garden debut in another Puccini role, as Pinkerton in the Royal Opera's Madame Butterfly, to rave reviews. Next season, he'll be the dramatic role of Don Alvaro in Verdi's La forza del destino at the Semperoper in Dresden, and will also be making his debut at Opera National du Rhin in Strasbourg, in a new production of Riccardo Zandonai's Francesca da Rimini, as another doomed romantic hero. What's up with that? I spoke with Marcelo about singing romantic leads, why he dropped out of medical school (true story), and just why audiences should care about a character like Cavaradossi.



(Photo of Marcelo Puente by Helen Bianco)

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